Author Topic: Prime phreaking  (Read 3967 times)

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Offline dweez

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Re: Prime phreaking
« Reply #15 on: October 05, 2015, 09:11:24 PM »
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Offline goldshirt*9

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Re: Prime phreaking
« Reply #16 on: October 06, 2015, 07:51:37 AM »
a snip at the price

Offline smokester

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Re: Prime phreaking
« Reply #17 on: October 06, 2015, 11:04:24 AM »
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-34444233

Edward Snowden interview: 'Smartphones can be taken over'....

I'd welcome the company.

Don't put off until tomorrow, what you can put off until the day after.

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Offline 6pairsofshoes

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Re: Prime phreaking
« Reply #18 on: October 06, 2015, 08:45:55 PM »
@t, I have a friend who is a professional mathematician.  He specializes in things like cohomologous and other imaginary spaces.  It seems like an extension of topology.  He works in a field known as mathematical physics.  I'm mostly unfamiliar with much of what you described above, although I did read some non-Euclidean geometry in a college history of mathematics course.

Math is interesting for its ability to describe space, movement, volume, and also to project conjectural spaces via those same methods of description.  It's a logical system that enables you to set up a series of definitions, terms and specific operations or functions that can be performed on those terms.  Rules.  Once those are established, you can play with the items set forth and see what results.  While mathematics may have evolved out of pragmatic real life applications, it eventually acquired increasingly abstract ideas, entities (like ZERO) and fields of description.

In short, it's not surprising that this would appeal to you.  I have good computational skills, but I struggled with Calculus.  I suspect it was due to the perfect storm of a bad textbook and a sucky lazy professor.  I was certainly eager to learn, but after spending hours on problem sets and getting no response to questions about them, and getting sick of observing the prof flirting with the other women in the class instead of teaching, I dropped the course.

@8ully, there are so many different ways to be intelligent.  You may have difficulties in some areas, but you are a genuinely bright guy.  Never let anyone tell you otherwise.
« Last Edit: October 06, 2015, 08:51:01 PM by 6pairsofshoes »

Offline tarascon

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Re: Prime phreaking
« Reply #19 on: October 12, 2015, 09:27:40 AM »
@8ully, there are so many different ways to be intelligent.  You may have difficulties in some areas, but you are a genuinely bright guy.  Never let anyone tell you otherwise.

I absolutely agree with that post, 6.

@t,...
In short, it's not surprising that this would appeal to you. 

Lest anyone give me credit where none is due I have to repeat what I'm sure I've posted before (Having just returned from a two day train trip and very much sleep deprived, I am very tired and don't feel like hunting up and quoting that post)... Edit. Duh, the OP.

I absolutely suck at doing arithmetic but found out rather late in life that I am able to read material on mathematical concepts--am quite good at that, in fact--and comprehend a lot of it. Where that ability comes from is an utter mystery to me! My passions are Number Theory (Primes and sets, for example) and the Transfinite numbers (and multiple infinities of the number line) which Cantor "discovered." For me, the trick is to read this stuff as if it were imaginative science fiction. I also very much enjoy mathematical physics and tackle that the same way.
As a youth, the systematic destruction of any sense of wonder when it comes to things like math & science--as "taught" in school--pretty much ensured that boredom and a general bewilderment would quash the desire to try and understand wtf they were getting at.
« Last Edit: March 15, 2016, 08:11:01 AM by tarascon »
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Offline smokester

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Re: Prime phreaking
« Reply #20 on: October 12, 2015, 02:56:30 PM »
To be fair there is a massive distinction between mathematics and arithmetic, and they are barely related to one another. Mathematics is beautiful, elegant, abstract, theoretical and philosophical, but completely unnecessary and desperately unsuited to schoolchildren: arithmetic is absolutely necessary, and essentially simple, therefore it must be taught to all at school, but because it is so simple it is boring.

Someone misguidedly decided that the beauty and elegance of mathematics may attract the young and so they mix it in to the arithmetic - this causes nothing but problems.

Adding is easy. Anyone can learn to do it, and everyone should. Once you have the hang of adding, taking away, repeatedly adding (multiplying) and its inverse (dividing) are easy too. And that is where school can justifiably finish. If all schoolchildren came out of school with a perfect grasp of these four things, then their time at school was not wasted. We need to dedicate our not inconsiderable resources into making this education effective, even though the subject matter is desperately unattractive to children.

But there is no excuse for subjecting generation after generation to calculus, algebra, matrices, logarithms, geometry, statistics or any of the other stuff. That is wonderful, mind-expanding stuff, but completely chuffing useless to 99.99 % of the population.

We mathematicians love the beauty of our art, but it is totally unfair to subject each generation of schoolchildren to it.

In my son's case: he likes "calculus, algebra, matrices, logarithms, geometry, statistics" because understanding gives him a thrill - whether he ever uses it on the real world or not.  A bit like the off-side rule to millions of pub goers.

Don't put off until tomorrow, what you can put off until the day after.

There is an exception to every rule, apart from this one.

Offline smokester

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Re: Prime phreaking
« Reply #21 on: October 12, 2015, 04:14:13 PM »
Yup. Some people like (and are good at) ballet, opera, painting, acting, dancing and a bunch of other things: they should be free to follow their hearts, and we should spend taxpayer money to support such learning, but it shouldn't be compulsory for everyone to do it.

We have developed a core curriculum in which there are a set of prescribed subjects that everyone must learn - in itself a good idea - everyone should have a grasp of English and Science (and there may even be a case for some grounding in a few apparently useless humanities and/ or languages), but my point is that the compulsory element should include arithmetic but not mathematics.

I am of the opinion that most lawmakers and educationalists are blind to the difference - possibly because of the asinine insistence of calling the sums that we do in kindergarten "mathematics" "maths" or even "math" in the apparent misguided belief that there is no difference between arithmetic and mathematics.

Forcing all children to do something useless and unnecessary is, in the modern idiom, abuse.

Kids aren't kids for that long, even less when they were the ones to judge when they are old enough to stop doing what they are told. You are left with a brief opportunity to cram what you can into one of their ears, knowing full well that most of it will fall out the other. If you're lucky, they may well learn enough in that period to allow them to further themselves under their own steam.

Never happened for me. I gave up lurnin' at around the age of eleven and it shows every day in some way or another.

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Don't put off until tomorrow, what you can put off until the day after.

There is an exception to every rule, apart from this one.

Offline tarascon

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