Author Topic: Experiments in Cooking : Sous Vide  (Read 53 times)

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Offline aelthric

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Experiments in Cooking : Sous Vide
« on: November 05, 2019, 01:49:35 PM »
Who would have thought that the humble "Boil in the bag" method of cooking would ever be adopted by Michelin Star Chefs and their ilk as the go to method for their food creations? I have overlooked this method of cooking as simply convenience cooking in the past, that is until a mate of mine living in Canada started raving about how good the food was that he cooked in his "Sous Vide" to which I asked "A Sous What?" and so he explained what Sous Vide cooking was as something between "boil in the bag" and one of those "slow cookers" that was so popular in the 70's (Damn this makes me feel old) and after hearing him week after week ramble on about how good this was I decided to save my pennies decided to get one.

OK a Sous Vide looks like a tropical fish tank  which you fill with water with a large water heater / pump  and the heater / pump then heats the water to a precise temperature and keeps it at that temperature for up to 100 hours. when the water is up to your desired temperature you put your food (Which you have pre=prepared in a vacuum sealed plastic bag (Capable of being boiled) and drop it in the water and leave it for a length of time to cook slowly (Differs on what you wish to achieve) In this way the cheapest cuts of steak that are usually as tough as old leather are as tender as the finest filet steak that after cooking you simply char in a hot pan or with a chefs blowtorch for taste and hey presto the most succulent, tender and juicy steak you ever ate...

I remember seeing this method used by a Nottingham dual Michelin Star Chef named Sat Bains to cook duck eggs, normally duck eggs, like chicken eggs, will go white when boiled but using the sous vide and cooking the duck eggs for approximately 1 and half hours at the temperature of 62 degrees Celcius (143.6 F) the eggs whites solidify but remain transparent which is extremely weird to see.

Pros:

Really tender meat

Ability to cook in the taste of any marinate

Unsupervised convenience

Full flavour

Cons :

You need to buy a vacuum sealer and suitable bags for your preparations.

I will add more info as I try different things with this method...
 
               

Offline 8ullfrog

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Re: Experiments in Cooking : Sous Vide
« Reply #1 on: November 05, 2019, 05:14:41 PM »
I never knew I was a Sous Vide chef!

(Specifically, supermarket chipped beef comes in a sealed plastic bag, I boil it rather than microwave it, because it burns in the nukrawave)

Then you just cut a corner off the bag and funnel it onto the toast. I should pick some up today, since it was cold last night.
just one little time change so a draft board in 1968 turns down the bribe to accept "bone spurs" and we are home-free.

Offline aelthric

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Re: Experiments in Cooking : Sous Vide
« Reply #2 on: November 05, 2019, 08:54:10 PM »
I never knew I was a Sous Vide chef!

(Specifically, supermarket chipped beef comes in a sealed plastic bag, I boil it rather than microwave it, because it burns in the nukrawave)

Then you just cut a corner off the bag and funnel it onto the toast. I should pick some up today, since it was cold last night.

8ully there are Michelin Star Chefs and restaurants using this so count yourself among their esteemed numbers my friend  ;D , right now I am trying to convince Bubu to get one for her place in Italy but I think it is going to be an uphill battle as Italy boasts some of the best cooking in Europe and it is hard to explain how this would be of any advantage to her <Shrugs>...
               

Offline 8ullfrog

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Re: Experiments in Cooking : Sous Vide
« Reply #3 on: November 05, 2019, 09:06:00 PM »
I mean, apparently that one company that delivers all the food to applebees delivers it in plastic bags, then they microwave it, so it doesn't qualify as Sous Vide. I hear even Olive Garden gets their sauces in big plastic sacks. My brain is saying con agra, but that's wrong. poo, I know this word but have aphasia on it. Last week it was provolone, my brain kept saying "Round white cheese" and "Pavlov". Super frustrating. It's not ChefAmerica either.

I used to change out the Coke sacks at the deli counter, and WOW were they specific about every step of that. Super strict. But I get it, no one wants a TV expose on how fuzzy the soda is. (Fuzzy, not fizzy)

I was shocked how little of a poo my coworkers gave about the ice container, that's like, an INSTA-FAIL, everyone is fired thing, and I was the guy who always ended up cleaning it.

That has nothing to do with Sous Vide though. :P
« Last Edit: November 05, 2019, 09:11:11 PM by 8ullfrog »
just one little time change so a draft board in 1968 turns down the bribe to accept "bone spurs" and we are home-free.

Offline aelthric

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Re: Experiments in Cooking : Sous Vide
« Reply #4 on: November 06, 2019, 08:07:20 AM »
I mean, apparently that one company that delivers all the food to applebees delivers it in plastic bags, then they microwave it, so it doesn't qualify as Sous Vide. I hear even Olive Garden gets their sauces in big plastic sacks. My brain is saying con agra, but that's wrong. poo, I know this word but have aphasia on it. Last week it was provolone, my brain kept saying "Round white cheese" and "Pavlov". Super frustrating. It's not ChefAmerica either.

I used to change out the Coke sacks at the deli counter, and WOW were they specific about every step of that. Super strict. But I get it, no one wants a TV expose on how fuzzy the soda is. (Fuzzy, not fizzy)

I was shocked how little of a poo my coworkers gave about the ice container, that's like, an INSTA-FAIL, everyone is fired thing, and I was the guy who always ended up cleaning it.

That has nothing to do with Sous Vide though. :P

I am old enough to remember when boil in the bag was a thing so I found it amusing that now top chefs use this method in their overpriced and snobby restaurants and call it a French name "Sous Vide" to make it sound as little like "Boil in the bag" as they can, though saying that it does have some things going for it in keeping in flavour, making even tough meat tender etc...

Don't let the aphasia worry you, I get it all the time to the point that if I am talking to Bubu and a word is just out of my brains reach she generally has to try and guess the word my brain cannot access and English is not her first language (That lady is amazing)...
               

Offline aelthric

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Re: Experiments in Cooking : Sous Vide
« Reply #5 on: Today at 09:22:05 AM »
UPDATE : so I followed a friends advice and bought a small cheap cut of beef, vacuum packed it with some salt, pepper and rosemary that I powdered in a coffee grinder and put it in the sous vide for 14 hours at 54c then finished it off in a hot oven (340c) for 30 minutes to brown off the outside and although this was a very cheap cut of beef the sous vide made it tender as a fine cut and I got that lovely pinkness in the middle that a good roast of beef should have.

The flavour was out of this world and although this was a small joint of beef (About 1 kg or 2.2 lbs) I ate heartily and had plenty left over to slice on the meat slicer for sandwiches and another roast meal (Usually beef joints shrink as they lose liquid to the cooking process but because it slow cooked in the sous vide prior to finishing off in the oven it retained most of its moisture and size)...

So far the Sous Vide has been worth getting, especially in light of the fact that I have been vacuum sealing food for the freezer for a while now. I checked my electric meter before and after I cooked the meat and worked out it cost 70p in total use of electricity during that time, that includes lighting, computer and monitor running and several other electrical appliances so it seems that the Sous Vide is also quite energy efficient (I did wrap the sous vide tank in layers of tea towels to try and insulate it to try and cut down the amount of energy required to use it and I think it worked quite well.

The next project for the sous vide will be a half leg of lamb, I may invest in some aluminium insulation foam that I can surround the sous vide tank to see if I can cut down on heat loss and therefor energy usage even further than by surrounding it in tea towels...

I did try to do the 62 degree duck eggs but that was a failure mainly because I probably got impatient and did not give them the proper amount of time for them to solidify properly...
« Last Edit: Today at 09:27:35 AM by aelthric »