Author Topic: Reader's Nook  (Read 37777 times)

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Offline Discover99

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Re: Re: Book Club & Parchments
« Reply #15 on: March 25, 2013, 10:57:17 AM »
I'm not in a reading phase either atm. The latest book I've read is EspaƱol Nivel I detective novel series (Lola Largo) set in Madrid called Por amor al arte.
It's really short, easy to read, and surprisingly funny and well written

Offline goldshirt*9

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Re: Re: Book Club & Parchments
« Reply #16 on: March 25, 2013, 11:08:29 AM »
Stalker atm. only a couple of paragraphs in.
I am going to try and complete
le morte d'arthur soon.

Offline 6pairsofshoes

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Re: Re: Book Club & Parchments
« Reply #17 on: March 25, 2013, 11:21:36 AM »
Discover, those mysteries sound intriguing.  Are you reading them to improve your Spanish?

I started reading Maigret novels in French to improve my reading and vocabulary.  They're not so hard and really fun.  It would be great to find more titles for the same purpose in Spanish.   I read some short stories by Borges and a good deal of poetry, but mystery novels would be easier and less work than trying to decipher idiomatic language that you'd find in poetry.

People also tend to talk in conversational language in mystery novels and that also helps when you actually talk to people.  Four years of spanish and I sound like a twit when I speak to people around here, primarily because, although I've read all kinds of technical stuff, I have had very limited experience in conversation.

Offline townie2

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Re: Re: Book Club & Parchments
« Reply #18 on: March 25, 2013, 12:08:58 PM »
currently reading Dean Koontz's Brother Odd, it's one of a mini series of books centered on the trials and tribulations of Odd Thomas, who is a traveling short order cook with some strange psychic abilities.
just finished reading We Are Anonymous: Inside the Hacker World of LulzSec, found it interesting, inside workings and methods of the groups, and how some eventually got caught.

Offline xtopave

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Re: Re: Book Club & Parchments
« Reply #19 on: March 25, 2013, 03:19:31 PM »
currently reading Dean Koontz's Brother Odd

I've read the 2 books released for the Moonlight Bay trilogy (Fear Nothing and Seize the Night). Suspense novels about a guy with Xeroderma pigmentosum. You might call him "beach reading" but it's very entertaining.

Offline tarascon

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Re: Re: Book Club & Parchments
« Reply #20 on: March 25, 2013, 05:45:53 PM »
I read anything and everything.  And I take issue with the dismissal of Stephen King.  I once thought that he was just another pulp novelist and, thus, not deserving of respect.  Then somebody gave me a copy of Pet Sematary.  I was surprised.  He is a gifted writer.  His descriptions and plots are quite skillful, even if they are executed in a limited genre.  Is it high art?  No.  But his books are entertaining and well-crafted.

  I've never read Pet Sematary so I can't comment on that; I did find The Shining to be a good book. So on that one point I will back down. The other books of his I've read--The Stand, for example--was awful. King comes up with decent plots but the stuff I have read tended to end with a deus ex machina... the biggest sin in my opinion for a writer to commit. That, plus the fact that his books are heavy on dialogue (which is the easiest thing to do in creative fiction) and weak in execution make him (for me) an author undeserving of his reputation. Also, he tends to introduce unlikely characters into his books, characters which actually weaken the story and which become a nuisance to the point of distraction. The Raggedy Man is such a character... Gratuitous weirdness has limited charm and is never necessary to his plots. I think that some of this may be the publisher's and editor's fault. Once a formula works and then sells well the demand for innovation takes a nose-drive and the author tends to remain static. King praised Lovecraft's Supernatural Horror in Literature in several reviews years ago--and this is exactly why I have to wonder what King's doing in his novels, because he must know better.
  Taking issue with me because I gave an opinion is something I cannot control but my mind remains unchanged.
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Offline xtopave

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Re: Re: Book Club & Parchments
« Reply #21 on: March 25, 2013, 06:05:33 PM »
My sister has a love-hate relationship with King, she has read most of all he wrote and she says pretty much what you say only she does not say it that "prettily".  ;D   I always like to read what you write, tarascon.

Offline Autumn

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Re: Re: Book Club & Parchments
« Reply #22 on: March 25, 2013, 07:33:09 PM »
I've liked king's novels, but I like the short stories better. I definitely don't think he is the best writer in his genre either, but I, like 6, read almost anything. I have read so few books that I could not finish because they weren't good.

Offline dweez

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Re: Re: Book Club & Parchments
« Reply #23 on: March 25, 2013, 09:01:58 PM »
I'm a King fan but I'll admit when it gets weak.  The last three in the Dark Tower series were lacking but I'm still glad I read them, if not just to say I completed it.  "The Eyes of the Dragon" is one of my most favorite books.  I heard a story once that Tabitha, his daughter, asked him why he didn't write anything she could read.  "The Eyes of the Dragon" is the result.  I enjoyed it thoroughly.
--dweez

Offline 6pairsofshoes

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Re: Re: Book Club & Parchments
« Reply #24 on: March 26, 2013, 12:22:42 AM »
So I confess, my knowledge of Stephen King is limited to one novel and one short story.  Everything else has been movies or tv miniseries.

The Stand was a bloated train wreck that had the sketchy outlines of an interesting plot that soon just turned into bible thumping dreck.  I assumed it was because the suits at the network had had their way with it.  But, upon reflection, the book appeared as if it could double as a doorstop.

It's probably not much better in the way of coherence.  Still, it's kind of like some bands you listen to that can crank out one or two really inspired songs and then produce albums that are mostly meh.

Offline Discover99

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Re: Re: Book Club & Parchments
« Reply #25 on: March 26, 2013, 03:51:42 AM »
Discover, those mysteries sound intriguing.  Are you reading them to improve your Spanish?

I started reading Maigret novels in French to improve my reading and vocabulary.  They're not so hard and really fun.  It would be great to find more titles for the same purpose in Spanish.   I read some short stories by Borges and a good deal of poetry, but mystery novels would be easier and less work than trying to decipher idiomatic language that you'd find in poetry.

People also tend to talk in conversational language in mystery novels and that also helps when you actually talk to people.  Four years of spanish and I sound like a twit when I speak to people around here, primarily because, although I've read all kinds of technical stuff, I have had very limited experience in conversation.

Yes I do read them to improve my Spanish, I'm living in Spain well Catalunya right now and really want to get better at speaking at least one of the two languages spoken here :)
And I agree, they do use a more colloquial language. 
Por amor al arte by Lourdes Miquel/Neus Sans
part of the 'Lola Lago, detective' series

Offline tarascon

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Re: Re: Book Club & Parchments
« Reply #26 on: March 26, 2013, 04:37:38 AM »
So I confess, my knowledge of Stephen King is limited to one novel and one short story.  Everything else has been movies or tv miniseries.

I really don't mean to belabor my point--and I do feel a bit foolish for my rant above--but your comment that King is a gifted writer surprised me. I almost took that as a personal affront which says a lot about my issues. Still, you were the last person on these fora that I expected to hear that from. And as for your "doorstop" comment... that's what I meant by his stuff being heavy on the dialogue--it's as if King is conscripted to write bloated books with the accompanying fat price tag. I'm willing to let this drop now and not spend more time in this thread discussing the pros and cons of Mr. King.  :)

I'm reading The Paris Commune of 1871 by Frank Jellinek.
Rather than describe the book, I will refer you all to this: http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/52177.The_Paris_Commune_of_1871* and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paris_Commune

* The typo on that page really disturbs me. lol
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Offline Autumn

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Re: Re: Book Club & Parchments
« Reply #27 on: March 26, 2013, 05:22:26 AM »
It took me a minute to find it!

Offline Beatrix

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Re: Re: Book Club & Parchments
« Reply #28 on: March 26, 2013, 07:16:25 AM »
Alright, on King, although I own a few of his books, I've only read from IT, and I really enjoyed the movie thinner, I would probably like the book. 
Dweez, that's a cool fact about himself and his daughter. 
I'm reading East of Eden again. This is about the 4th time in the decade since I first read it.  That is a lot for me, I have a hard time finishing books.  Eden has distinctive characters, colorful, but not over done.  A story that will break your heart and make you wane in your seat from the tension. 
I bought a copy of Patti Smith's book, "Just Kids" and finally found a copy of the Outlaw Bible of American Poetry.... I've waited a decade to own that book, and can't find a moment to open it.  If I've wanted to read in the last month I've gone for Eden. 

I still stand by Chuck Palahniuk's RANT, best new book I have read in a cat's life. Story of a wild child living in a country town in the south, with a VERY surprising twist. 
« Last Edit: March 26, 2013, 07:21:10 AM by Beatrix »

Offline tarascon

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Re: Re: Book Club & Parchments
« Reply #29 on: March 26, 2013, 07:39:43 AM »
Palahniuk is a lot of fun. I've read about four of his novels.
The book he wrote about the young Chinese sleeper agent (Pygmy) is probably my favorite. Strange... but I haven't read Fight Club yet.


 
« Last Edit: March 26, 2013, 07:43:15 AM by tarascon »
Estragon: I can't go on like this.
Vladimir: That's what you think.