Author Topic: Sockarooni  (Read 8978 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline 8ullfrog

  • Homo Superior
  • ******
  • Posts: 3170
Sockarooni
« on: May 22, 2013, 09:49:32 PM »
For years I've wondered why sometimes I love spaghetti, and sometimes it makes me wanna barf.

Today I solved that mystery. I tend not to make spaghetti myself because there is generally something I'd rather eat. Good spaghetti takes forever to cook, and if you rush it, it sucks.

Meatballs require a lot of effort, and the payoff is sub par. Frozen meatballs, are of course, an abomination.

So I was making spaghetti on demand, and used Paul Newman's Sockarooni sauce. And I HATED IT. And now I have the answer.

If the sauce has bell pepper in it? I'm not going to enjoy it. So Thank you Paul Newman, for teaching me what I hate, just a little bit more.

Offline mishca09

  • Q
  • *
  • Posts: 11386
Re: Sockarooni
« Reply #1 on: May 22, 2013, 10:05:42 PM »
do you have a little italy near you? the one near me makes the most delicious fresh pasta and home made tomato sauce. anyways, I've never heard of socharooni sauce, it sounds disgusting.

Offline 8ullfrog

  • Homo Superior
  • ******
  • Posts: 3170
Re: Sockarooni
« Reply #2 on: May 22, 2013, 11:27:14 PM »
http://www.newmansown.com/products/newmans-own-sockarooni-sauce/

That lists the ingredients. ACID REFLUX AHOY!

Offline Autumn

  • Account on hold
  • Cro-Magnon
  • ****
  • Posts: 648
  • Gender: Female
  • No regrets
Re: Sockarooni
« Reply #3 on: May 23, 2013, 01:30:21 AM »
New mans stuff generally is pretty bad. Don't try the popcorn!

Offline xtopave

  • Moderator
  • Q
  • *
  • Posts: 28876
  • Gender: Female
Re: Sockarooni
« Reply #4 on: May 23, 2013, 06:07:01 AM »
Good spaghetti takes forever to cook, and if you rush it, it sucks.

Here's what can be done. The moment you decide you'll cook dried pasta you put the water to boil. This could take 5 to 10 min (depending on the size of the pan, the stove, etc). Meanwhile you organize the sauce, bread, cheese, etc. Then you cook the spaghetti. Another 7-10 min? During this time you set the table, wash the dishes you've used so far AND THE MOST IMPORTANT THING: you open and drink wine or beer or vermouth or etc.  ;D

Meatballs require a lot of effort, and the payoff is sub par.

Nah, nah, that is so wrong 8ull, pleeeaase.  :)

Offline smokester

  • Administrator
  • Q
  • *
  • Posts: 15877
  • Gender: Male
  • Da mihi castitatem et continentiam, sed noli modo!
Re: Sockarooni
« Reply #5 on: May 23, 2013, 06:43:21 AM »
Pasta dishes a easy and simple to make, just so long as you've had at least 10 years of experience beforehand.

I perfect the dishes I cook every time I make them.  The next batch always has to be better than the last.
Don't put off until tomorrow, what you can put off until the day after.

There is an exception to every rule, apart from this one.

Offline 6pairsofshoes

  • Homo Superior
  • ******
  • Posts: 3580
Re: Sockarooni
« Reply #6 on: May 23, 2013, 07:42:11 AM »
Here:  this recipe from Mario Batali is just great and not very difficult.  Simple ingredients, not expensive and really good with freshly grated pecorino romano cheese.  Takes about an hour from start to finish.

http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2007/10/mario-batali-recipe-for-marinara-sauce.html

6 tablespoons virgin olive oil (basically a quarter cup and use a heavy big pan/like sautee pan/frying pan w/thick bottom to distribute the heat evenly)
1 Spanish onion, cut into 1/4-inch dice (use a biggish one or two medium onions)
4 cloves garlic, thinly sliced (I use 6+)
4 teaspoons fresh thyme leaves (or 1 teaspoon dried) (You should invest in one of these plants.  They can be grown in a pot easily, or just buy the fresh herb at the grocers)
1/2 medium carrot, finely shredded (we use a whole carrot and grate it with a standing grater/if the tomatoes are really acidic you might want to add two medium carrots as they help sweeten the sauce)
2 28-ounce cans of tomatoes, crushed by hand and mixed well with their juices
Salt, to taste
(we add a couple sprinkles of red pepper flakes)

Procedures
1
Place oil into a sauce pan with onions and garlic, and cook over medium heat until translucent but not brown (about 10 minutes). Add the thyme and carrot; cook 5 minutes more. Add the tomatoes. Bring to a boil and then lower the heat to just bubbling, stirring occasionally for 30 minutes.  (We usually let it cook for more like 45).

2
Season with salt to taste. Serve immediately or set aside for further use. The sauce may be refrigerated for up to 1 week or frozen for up to 6 months.

(Taste it part way through and if it seems a little too acidic, add a small teaspoon of sugar.)

This sauce freezes well, so you can make a batch for a couple meals and freeze the leftovers in plastic containers for later.  It thaws and reheats quickly.
« Last Edit: May 23, 2013, 07:46:21 AM by 6pairsofshoes »

Offline smokester

  • Administrator
  • Q
  • *
  • Posts: 15877
  • Gender: Male
  • Da mihi castitatem et continentiam, sed noli modo!
Re: Sockarooni
« Reply #7 on: May 23, 2013, 10:25:35 AM »
How many is this intended to serve? (Sounds like enough for 10 or more to me.)

Throw in a couple of fish and a few loaves of bread and I'd bet you'd feed 5000 or more.
Don't put off until tomorrow, what you can put off until the day after.

There is an exception to every rule, apart from this one.

Offline bubu

  • Homo Erectus
  • **
  • Posts: 131
  • Gender: Female
Re: Sockarooni
« Reply #8 on: May 23, 2013, 10:42:21 AM »
Just the name of the sauce is repulsive, I imagine what the taste could be ...

Offline xtopave

  • Moderator
  • Q
  • *
  • Posts: 28876
  • Gender: Female
Re: Sockarooni
« Reply #9 on: May 23, 2013, 10:52:17 AM »
Throw in a couple of fish and a few loaves of bread and I'd bet you'd feed 5000 or more.

Maybe. If there are members of my family among them you could feed 5.

Just the name of the sauce is repulsive, I imagine what the taste could be ...

Is it "sock" an ingredient?  :D

Offline 6pairsofshoes

  • Homo Superior
  • ******
  • Posts: 3580
Re: Sockarooni
« Reply #10 on: May 23, 2013, 12:10:20 PM »
How many is this intended to serve? (Sounds like enough for 10 or more to me.)

You probably could feed 8-10 people with this sauce, depending on how much you dress the pasta with.  My husband and I usually are able to get about 5 dinners out of this.  We mix homegrown tomatoes that I put up (usually a quart jar) with a 28 oz can of tomatoes and sometimes throw in a second 14 oz can of diced ones for texture.  We normally freeze enough for a couple of dinners, but we can easily eat it off and on for over a week.  It's often better the next day, too, so it's a good choice if you have company coming on a day when you have other things to do.

bubu Marinara sauce was called that because it was originally made for mariners, sailors.

Offline bubu

  • Homo Erectus
  • **
  • Posts: 131
  • Gender: Female
Re: Sockarooni
« Reply #11 on: May 23, 2013, 03:44:45 PM »
good recipe six, I do the same when I make sauces of any kind, make a lot of it and freezer it, and yes it makes sense but I didn't know about the marinara sauce, I thought it was for the fishes in it,  mare (sea) and marinai (sailors)
« Last Edit: May 26, 2013, 11:05:38 AM by bubu »

Offline 8ullfrog

  • Homo Superior
  • ******
  • Posts: 3170
Re: Sockarooni
« Reply #12 on: May 24, 2013, 03:34:01 AM »
It tastes like tomato sauce overpowered by bell peppers.

In my youth, I loved when dad would make stuffed bell peppers. Mom saw this, and attempted to copy. Dad was the cook in the family, and mom tends to repeat herself.

So when she cooked, she made stuffed bell peppers. Again and again.

I no longer enjoy bell peppers.

poo, looking back on that really makes me miss my dad. He was a big, gruff man, like worf on star trek, but he cooked like a tiny frenchman.

He could take canned food and make it taste like he picked that poo up at the farmers market. This was important as we lived on a boat, and the sum total of fridge storage was the equivalent of a mini-fridge. 

We had a full sized bathroom though, which was kinda like an oversized shower shell with a toilet and sink in it. I really miss that boat too.

I never understand why people buy boats without toilets, or those embarrassing toilets you can't poop in.

If I wanted to use parking lot bathrooms, I'd buy a bless'ed RV.

Man, did I wander off topic.

Offline 6pairsofshoes

  • Homo Superior
  • ******
  • Posts: 3580
Re: Sockarooni
« Reply #13 on: May 24, 2013, 10:02:24 AM »
My mother used to make stuffed bell peppers.  I hated them.  The peppers are bitter.  In order to remove the bitterness, you have to blanche them several times in hot water and pour it off.  She never bothered.  She'd mix up white rice, hamburger meat and dump some tomato paste on top.  It was all I could do to choke it down.  She wasn't much of a cook, sadly.

She also routinely burned cauliflower to the point where the house took on terrible acrid odors. 

Only recently have I been able to eat cauliflower.  Now I roast it with garlic, tossed in olive oil and lemon juice.  It's great.

I'm so sorry that your father died so young, 8ully.  It sounds like you really miss him.

Offline 8ullfrog

  • Homo Superior
  • ******
  • Posts: 3170
Re: Sockarooni
« Reply #14 on: May 25, 2013, 07:29:07 PM »
HAHA, that's exactly what my mom did when she made them.

No demon Cauliflower, although we once had a roommate move out because mom likes broccoli, and that has a quite distinctive smell when cooked.

I forget the exact saying, but there is some quote about how you really miss someone when you reach for the fruit of their labor and are left wanting.

In this case, I miss how he could make  even lousy canned Franco American spaghetti taste fancy.

That being said, he had some odd tastes. Vienna sausages for one. Yuk.

He also lied to me and said rolos were medicine so I wouldn't eat them.

When I spoke with mom about the bell peppers, she said that she made dad buy a bigger fridge when she moved onto the boat.